Daily beer project

Beer #2: Samuel Adams Boston Lager

Posted in American Craft Beer by dailybeerproject on January 15, 2010

I had a mix of anticipation and apprehension about the Boston Lager. Anticipation to work on my pouring technique, per the recommendation Etiberius gave me in the comments. But I’ll admit to being apprehensive about the actual drinking given my past experience with lager and that the Boston Ale wasn’t markedly better.

I have some work to do on the pouring yet. This time I used a pint glass, tipped it at a 45 degree angle, and poured to hit halfway down the glass. I still ended up with too much head and had to let it subside a bit before pouring the last of it in.

The poorly-executed pour did nothing for the apprehension about drinking. The first sip was similar to my previous attempt: I enjoyed the initial sour-sweet flavor, but the bitterness was still harsh.

From there it got better, though. The middle third, instead of being difficult, went better than the first third. It didn’t seem as bitter. I wouldn’t describe it as enjoyable, but I began seeing beer as something I could drink socially when circumstances arose.

From there it got better still. By the end I was thinking I could have a second beer and perhaps enjoy it more than the first. I started to savor it–didn’t want to drink it too fast. I can see it becoming something I choose to drink, and I’m looking forward to the hefeweizen tomorrow.

That didn’t take long, did it.

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5 Responses

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  1. Alex/Watcher said, on January 15, 2010 at 10:12 pm

    I’ll be interested to see how you react to the hefeweizen. Though I’m not generally a big fan, it’s popular with many people who aren’t otherwise big beer drinkers, including many women. (Don’t let this dissuade you- but if you also start drinking cosmopolitans and smoking Lark cigarettes, we’re going to have to talk.)

    Many folks drink hefeweizen with lemon, which sounds weird, but in German (at least Bavarian- beer styles varies tremendously throughout Germany) beer gardens in summertime, a common drink is a 50/50 mix of hefeweizen and lemondae, which I really enjoyed.

    I *do* like dark hefeweizen, technically dunkelweizen, which is a common beer in Bavaria. I really like Spaten Optimator.

    • dailybeerproject said, on January 15, 2010 at 10:25 pm

      For the sake of science, I’m going with a no acoutrements approach to this project. No lemons in the hefeweizen, no limes in the Corona (if I ever even try Corona).

      50/50 hefeweizen and lemonade sounds like it could be a nice summertime drink, though.

    • gregclimbs said, on January 19, 2011 at 7:39 am

      Just found this blog via watcher.

      Just thought I would point out that while watcher is right in that beer mixed with lemonade and/or other beverages are age old traditions (and typically to appeal to the female drinkers), the lemon or orange wedge in a hefeweisen is an american construct. Even if it has since be adapted on both sides of the ocean.

      there is a great section on this in Stan’s book on wheat beers:

      http://shop.beertown.org/brewers/product.asp?s_id=0&prod_name=Brewing+with+Wheat&pf_id=3100_498&dept_id=3101

      g

  2. […] Really easy to drink. It had virtually no bitterness and a very pleasant sour aspect. Alex/Watcher mentioned that “it’s popular with many people who aren’t otherwise big beer drinkers, including many […]

  3. […] dailybeerproject on January 17, 2010 After the more-positive-than-I-expected experience with the Samuel Adams Boston Lager the other night, I was wondering whether I would decide I prefer lagers to Ales. After tonight, I […]


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